Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Discussion of TJ's most popular venture to date!
User avatar
skftex
TJ Team Validator
Posts: 2304
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 9:16 pm
Location: Texas
Contact:

Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by skftex »

Not sure if I need spoiler space??
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*Okay I don't have a lot to say right off except I liked this one, pretty much all of it. Except the breakup between Roxy and Angela seemed a bit sudden...going from lets get a dog on Angela's part to No we need to break up because you live in the moment from Roxy..WHOA what???

Otherwise I thought it was a pretty good story this time. And I HOPE to be back to say more after I watch it again!
word count: 91
Blessed are they who see beautiful things in humble places where other people see nothing.-Camille Pissarro

Geishawannab
Fan
Posts: 23
Joined: Thu Mar 05, 2009 11:26 am

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by Geishawannab »

Hi Sharon,

Yeah the break-up was a little weird. Reminded me of another break-up last September (nudge, nudge). I was watching it with the hubby and he said, with sarcasm brimming to the max, "aw, poor you, I feel so sorry for you" (meaning Angela). I guess she had it coming.

I didn't understand Roxy's logic. As much as I wanted them to break-up, it should have been for something more substantial. Roxy wants someone who is not just "in the moment" but who is also focused on the future. While I understand this and that angela is definitely a "now" girl, why is Angela pushing Roxy to adopt a dog for when they move in together? Maybe it's just me, but that would be a good sign, not a bad one.

Aside from that, the bed scene with Hodgins made me realize how little chemistry there remains between these two characters. He was a little lovey-dovey but she acted as if they had just finished a game of tennis.

What I absolutley loved, LOVED, about this show however, was the last scene. This was the Booth I admire so much, and I'm so glad the writers didn't let this teenager get away from realizing the impact of his decisions. Tearing the picture up in pictures, telling him his would-be son was dead, and leaving just the victim's smiling face intact was pure magic. What an impact! I can't properly express how much I loved that scene. It made the show for me.
word count: 265

User avatar
ThyneAlone
TJ Team Validator
Posts: 2699
Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 2:30 am
Location: Northwest UK, near Liverpool

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by ThyneAlone »

Well, folks, bizarrely, this has not been uploaded to ANY of the sites where I regularly watch Bones online. You might have to tell me the story - well, the good bits at least. Do you remember, Rebecca, when I used not to be able to see it and you and other lovely people actually transcribed the best scenes! sooooo kind. Anyone any ideas? - where have others been?
word count: 67
"We make our lives out of chaos and hope. And love." - Angela Montenegro

Jude40
Conspiracy Theorist
Posts: 261
Joined: Wed Nov 05, 2008 1:41 pm
Location: Liverpool, UK

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by Jude40 »

Hi All

Hooray, an episode with a decent plotline and a really poignant one at that.

The break up did appear a bit sudden although not quite as annoyingly so as when Jack and Angela broke up. I liked a couple of the resultant scenes as well, Hodgins just looking at the earring (no words required) and Angela and Sweets undercover, a really 'sweet' scene (literally I suppose!), Sweets is definitely growing on me.

I quite liked the intern too, how lovely was he! I loved the way Brennan was so politically incorrect with regards to his prayer time, this was Brennan as we know and love the character, she is so not a people person and that's part of the character as a person (note to writers it doesn't need changing).

I agree that the real Booth was back in this one, not the cartoon character he has had a bit of a tendancy to be lately. I totally agree that the last scene was amazing and quite emotional actually.

Talking of characters being back to normal, I'm not sure if its the effect of different writers for different episodes but there does seem to be large variations in the behaviour of some characters dependant on the episode. I'm all for character development but in the same direction would be good (as they are in this episode please). I'm not sure if I made sense in this paragraph, I know what I mean but it was a bit difficult to explain.

I'm tempted to say that this is probably my favourite episode so far this season, all things considered.

Steph there are a load of links to different sites where you can view the episode on Bones fanpop, not sure if any will work for you.

Catch you later

Jude x
word count: 308

User avatar
ThyneAlone
TJ Team Validator
Posts: 2699
Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 2:30 am
Location: Northwest UK, near Liverpool

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by ThyneAlone »

Thanks Jude, but I have now managed to find it! I am getting quite good at ferreting out uploads (this one was on quicksilverscreen.com and a very satisfactory viewing). So what did I think? Well first I would say that Michaela looked absolutely stunning throughout. Stunning. It was the very first thing I noticed. TJ looked great too, but then he did take his top off, and when TJ takes his top off I am always pretty much 'I don't remember having a red carpet, oh whoops, it's my tongue...' Is it just me or is he gradually going barefaced again as well?

This was rather a slight storyline, with characters very much taking precedence. Because really a lot more could have been made of the pregnancies and their consequences, as indeed the relationships with the chiropractor and with the little boy (sorry - really can't see him as a man despite being a selfstyled stud). I felt the writers were playing around with a good idea, a genuine issue, and not quite having the airtime to give it proper depth. The last scene with Booth was very affecting, yes. He came over as strong and principled, and I have rather missed that. It was a world away from the character who would climb over all his work colleagues for the sake of a chair.

I'm not sure about the somewhat artificial Cam/Brennan conflict over the flesh and the bones, during which they both came over as unappealingly stubborn and bloodyminded, but I did like the nice continuity flashback to S2, with Brennan claiming one of her 'freebies'. I also liked the new intern. I loved the way he was so thoughtful and considerate of everybody, and particularly his sensitivity towards Angela. It was so cute when he gave her the CD.

Angela and Roxy. Like the Jack/Angela break up, it wasn't very convincing. The dog was some kind of metaphor for their different attitudes and the relationship, right? But there didn't seem to be a proper reason or a turning point that took them to a crossroads. All this candyfloss about Angela living 'in the moment' and outside commitment, I'm not entirely convinced. You can see in her talks with Sweets that while she has a certain image she likes to project (which includes frank, friendly, uncomplicated sex), she would secretly like to settle somewhat. A dog is definitely a start. I have a uni friend who is now 51 and so irresponsible we were convinced he would never grow up. Getting a dog with his present girlfriend is the nearest he's been to proper commitment EVER (and I know whereof I speak, having had a rather painful on-off 9-month fling with him way back when I was in my twenties).

The lovemaking with Hodgins? Well, when I can see through this green miasma, I will conclude that it was rather nice as moments go, and came over rather less exploitative and cold than I'd anticipated. Though she still is less keen than he is. Jack! Get out and find someone else! Mooning over her jewellery is not going to do you any good whatever!

It was good to see, even fleetingly, a vignette of Brennan and Angela in BFF mode. Tempe is not the best confidantes on the block, but she has some surprising (often accidental) insights, and it's been a loooooong time since we watched them exchange confidences. Let's see a bit more of that, Messieurs the Writers. And speaking of writing, you are right - the characters are different under different writers. I really want to go and check every ep and make notes on who writes, directs and produces what....

Really tired, nust bed down. See you lot soon. <<yawn>>
word count: 639
"We make our lives out of chaos and hope. And love." - Angela Montenegro

TJ4ever
King of the Lab
Posts: 1393
Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2007 5:23 am
Location: Germany

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by TJ4ever »

"...but like all great moments... It passed!"

Loved this line! It's so true!

Simone.
Last edited by TJ4ever on Mon Mar 23, 2009 4:24 am, edited 1 time in total. word count: 15
Angela: Well, what about love? What do you have to say about love?
Hodgins: It´s overrated-most of the time :-)


Dexter: They make it look so easy-connecting with another human being. It's like no one told them it's the hardest thing in the world.

TJ4ever
King of the Lab
Posts: 1393
Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2007 5:23 am
Location: Germany

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by TJ4ever »

A question just popped into my mind:
Why does Hodgins do that to himself??? :?: :(
Simone.
word count: 15
Angela: Well, what about love? What do you have to say about love?
Hodgins: It´s overrated-most of the time :-)


Dexter: They make it look so easy-connecting with another human being. It's like no one told them it's the hardest thing in the world.

Lorenith
Fan
Posts: 97
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by Lorenith »

Hodgins does these things to himself, because he's in love, and he has got a relatively obsessive personality to begin with which is a pretty dangerous combination when it comes to ones mental health.
word count: 35

TJ4ever
King of the Lab
Posts: 1393
Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2007 5:23 am
Location: Germany

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by TJ4ever »

Yeah I know! It was more a rhetorical question! It's just it hurts him. He looked so sad at the end of this episode!
Simone.
Last edited by TJ4ever on Fri Mar 27, 2009 5:12 pm, edited 1 time in total. word count: 26
Angela: Well, what about love? What do you have to say about love?
Hodgins: It´s overrated-most of the time :-)


Dexter: They make it look so easy-connecting with another human being. It's like no one told them it's the hardest thing in the world.

User avatar
skftex
TJ Team Validator
Posts: 2304
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 9:16 pm
Location: Texas
Contact:

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by skftex »

I was planning on watching this episode again and coming back to comment, but I think that there were some positive developments in this one with the Hodgins/Angela relationship. I liked that Jack told Angela that it was a moment and now it is gone, because that means he is realistic about where Angela is, and he didn't seem so much like he was moping about it but sort of that melancholy that you get when you look back at things sometimes. The memories are good and the fact that the person you spent it with is not with you anymore.

Okay that is it until I get to watch it again!
word count: 114
Blessed are they who see beautiful things in humble places where other people see nothing.-Camille Pissarro

Geishawannab
Fan
Posts: 23
Joined: Thu Mar 05, 2009 11:26 am

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by Geishawannab »

Yes I agree there Sharon. I believe it was a moment of closure for Jack and a moment of understanding for Angela. They both realized that as much as you loved someone, there comes a time when you have to let go of something, a relationship, that no longer exists tangibly. Only the memories and some lingering feelings remain. I felt it was a very poignant exchange between them and I'm glad the writers let us see this.
word count: 79

Sandy
Fan
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Mar 07, 2009 2:28 pm
Location: Spain

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by Sandy »

I liked the episode .... aw Hodgins is adorable ....Hodgins & Angela moments was so cute!! :D im unlikely the reason that Roxy gave to break up with Angela .. " to look at the future " " you never know what will happen in the future, I agree with Angela it of living the moment.

Other nice moment is Angela and Brennan, best friend´s moments..Exchanging advices and confessions .. i was missing these moments between them... I have to confess that I surprised when Brennan gives a kiss to Angela.. :roll:

Also I have liked the end, when Booth speaks with the boy and opens his eyes about his responsability as father. Booth is so nice guy!!
word count: 111
Image

Sinkwriter72
King of the Lab
Posts: 1856
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2007 3:21 pm
Location: Illinois, USA

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by Sinkwriter72 »

Okay, people. Sharon asked me over in the Off-Topic thread when I was going to post my thoughts about this episode. She should know better than to ask me such a question, because that leads to lengthy posting. :D This time is no exception, so those of you who don't have the time or inclination to read my ramblings, feel free to scroll on by. ;)

You asked for it, Sharon. Heee. Here we go...


For a moment, the opening sequence feels like classic Booth and Brennan -- out in the field together, she doing her bones identification part, he examining the ‘broader picture’ crime scene. We even see Booth’s expression shift when Brennan points out that the victim was most likely a teenaged girl; it’s the Booth I love, sober when it’s important to be. As a father of a young boy, as a former sniper, as a man who has killed, he takes death seriously. But the writers blew it by having him then make that crude comment (that the girl’s remains, partially preserved because of rock salt, suddenly make him crave potato chips). That presents more of the out-of-character, over-obvious, clownish Booth of whom we’ve seen a lot this season. A forced comment meant to be ‘funny,’ this is the type of ‘witty’ Booth and Brennan banter the media has been touting a lot lately. But the thing is, it’s not funny, and it’s not Booth to say something like that. He can be an incredibly charming and funny character, but one thing I’ve always appreciated about him was his seriousness when it mattered the most, like when confronted with the death of a kid, as we see here. Instead, it feels like a prime example of how the writers have been forcing these ‘comic’ moments, as if that’s the kind of pattern they’re now expected to establish at the start of every episode. Again, the thing to me is, when has this show ever been conventional like that? Its unconventionality -- in its characters and its premise -- was one thing I loved about this program. So why is it trying to force itself into a box now?

Frankly, that potato chip comment is something I expect to hear from Hodgins or Zack. Not because they’re jerks, but because that’s how they seem to deal with grave matters like this. For example, Zack’s ‘crispy critter’ comments in the pilot, or Hodgins making snarky comments and laying in the tub after it had been fully scrubbed of all evidence in “Truth in the Lye.” It’s in their natures to joke rather than cry, when faced with some of the bodies they’ve had to examine and pick apart.

My main point about this is, I don’t understand the need to force humor out of Booth, especially during moments where humor isn’t warranted. The potato chip comment was crass, not charming, and the fact that the camera stayed on Booth while he attempted to make a follow-up funny face (until the credits kicked in) merely managed to irritate. I was not impressed.

I’m also trying to wrap my head around this whole teen pregnancy pact storyline.

First off, awesome to see Amy Pietz doing TV again, playing the victim’s mother. I used to enjoy her work on Caroline in the City. She was great on that show, very funny, and incidentally has an awesome singing voice. Yay for her.

Secondly, I am clearly going to hell because this line is funny to me every time: “If it wasn’t for my faith in Jesus, there would have been sexual intercourse.” Oh man, that is just so wrong… I can’t even… I’m sorry… heeee.

That bit of wackiness aside…

Showing a group of girls who all got pregnant by the same guy, plan to nest in the same home and raise their children together, and claim “we’re quite intelligent”… I’m sorry, I really have to eye roll that. These girls were supposed to be the overachievers of their school? I felt like the characterizations as presented were stereotypical and quite frankly, insulting to smart teenaged girls. Yes, things happen. Smart kids can get pregnant at very young ages, but the episode seems to be 1) glamorizing their decisions, and 2) presenting girls as if they’re silly, clueless, and happy to become mothers -- an enormous responsibility in itself! -- instead of facing their fears about their futures. I loved the speech Booth gave Clinton at the end (more on that later), but where was the speech given to these young women? So, it’s important for a guy to be a man and take responsibility for his actions, but these girls couldn’t hear the same and learn to stand up to their parents and let them know that they were struggling and uncertain about what they wanted to do with their lives? Where was the speech teaching them that they had other options instead of choosing something so permanent as pregnancy and motherhood? Where was the speech teaching them to take what they did seriously?

Look at that baby shower scene. Everyone’s chattering away happily, holding babies or patting pregnant bellies, casually talking to Booth and Brennan about how great motherhood is, like it’s so easy, and how nice to have a little club of friends to make it even easier.

Brennan: So one boy is the father of four babies…
Girl: (smiling) Mm-hmm.

Seriously, the smile on that girl’s face… I liked her scene with Sweets, but in this particular moment, I wanted to slap some sense into her. I don’t know if it was the script or the director’s choice to go that way, but I thought it made a mockery of the situation, like yeah, no big deal, we’re all pregnant by the same boy and we’re happy about it. SERIOUSLY? I would have been devastated if that had happened to me in high school. The presentation of all these girls as being in perfect harmonious agreement about their choices made them unbelievable to me as a viewer, not to mention making them all seem incredibly stupid and clueless, because there is NO way every one of them would be so blissful about it. Surely at least one of them would be terrified and worried, even with their ‘perfect’ plan to live together and help each other.

In the end, while I appreciated Brennan returning to her anthropological reasoning, I didn’t buy what she said about understanding what those girls decided to do. Like them, she strove to be the very best, but those aspects of her personality -- her years of education, her brilliance and her independence -- are very important to her so I can’t see her understanding why they gave up everything like they did. Instead, I could see her thinking they were being childish and irrational to make such decisions based upon their emotions (feeling pressured by their parents, feeling fear about living their lives a certain way). I didn’t buy her defending them like she did, and I also thought her reasoning that women cannot count on men was ludicrous. (Though I will say I could buy Brennan believing that part, given that she couldn’t count on her father or her brother when she was a kid. I can definitely see that affecting her judgment on the matter.) Nevertheless, I felt that final scene between Booth and Brennan was out of character for Brennan. There’s no way she would champion those girls’ decisions to drop everything for which they’d already worked so hard, to skip college, and to turn away from knowledge (something Brennan craves). I don’t buy it. I felt it was a convenience in the plot and it didn’t work for me.

While I’m talking about cardboard cutout characters and convenient plot points... I’m slightly annoyed at the stereotype perpetuated by this show that you have to be some perfect size, especially in order to be considered popular or valued in some measure. In the past, the writers have often made fat jokes that I’ve felt were a bit insulting and unnecessary to the scene (even if they were trying to show Brennan’s lack of social skills), making comments about women’s bodies (ironically played by actresses who were in no way overweight; they just weren’t Hollywood skinny). And now they’re doing it again by acting like it’s impossible for girls to like a guy unless he’s some sort of physical ‘ideal,’ tall, muscular, and athletic. Do they really want to perpetuate that stereotype? Is that healthy?

Honestly? The boy I had a crush on all through high school was kind of skinny and lanky and only a couple inches taller than me; he wasn’t one of the most popular boys in school, he wasn’t the most classically handsome, but I was still strongly attracted to him. Why? Because he was nice to me. He was really sweet and he was smart, we had several of the same classes together, and we were both into music (him in the band, me in orchestra and chorus). And that made him really, really cute to me.

The point is, I know Booth used to be a jock in high school and the kind of guy who probably got the girls and thought highly of himself (or let that mask what he really felt, especially given what we now know of his childhood). However, I wish we’d seen some intelligent development of his character by now in this regard. With that whole smurf story Brennan shared with him and the episode with the school time capsule, I would have thought both Brennan and Booth would try to remember what they learned from those moments instead of immediately giving each other looks of surprise and amusement that this kid could possibly attract four different girls and get them to have sex with him. And Booth showing off that he could lift more weights than that kid? What was the point of that? What, that Booth didn’t get that many girls in school even though he could lift that kind of weight, so it’s therefore impossible for Clinton to get that many girls because he’s even more inferior than Booth is? Shouldn’t Booth have learned by now not to judge someone, especially after the recent episode where Brennan assumed things about him that weren’t true just because she listened to his stupid younger brother? Remember how Booth didn’t like to be called a loser, or treated like a loser? And here he is, pumping weights and scoffing at some young 16-year-old boy, treating him like a loser, coming close to calling him that to his face? That whole ‘4 teenagers getting pregnant by the same kid’ storyline is a bit implausible (man, I hope it is, anyway), but I just thought this aspect of it was a bit mean and unnecessary. By now, Booth should know better.

Speaking of people who should know better… what the heck was up with everyone snarking about that poor intern for his religious beliefs?

Previously, when a newbie got hazed or razzed by the team, it was for something involving his or her general personality (or just the simple fact that they didn’t want a newcomer taking Zack’s place), not about something so personal as religion. I wasn’t comfortable with the way they treated this poor guy, Arastoo.

Perhaps I’m biased, but the only line I found mildly funny (due to TJ’s amusingly dead-pan expression) was Hodgins’ comment: “On the bright side, we’ll always know which way is east.” *snort*

However, in an overall sense, I thought the team was very insensitive, not to mention bordering on harassment to keep mentioning it. These are really smart people; they know about and have visited plenty of other cultures. I thought it was out of character for everyone to be so baffled about his customs or snarky about someone being Muslim. Why did the writers feel that was the only way they could have the team ‘pick on’ this particular newbie intern?

Brennan even seemed to get in his face about it, repeatedly, which felt bizarre to me as a viewer.

On the one hand, I understand that as Angela’s best friend, Brennan may have felt a bit of over-protectiveness when the intern asked about her ‘boyfriend’ and then raised an eyebrow when he realized Angela was dating a woman. In addition, it seemed in character for her to comment that she finds all religions “equally irrational.”

On the other hand, the glaring and the scathing follow-up comment she provided when Arastoo came back from his prayer break -- “I have no choice. Apparently it’s a constitutional issue.” -- was obnoxious. Not even in-character Brennan obnoxious. It seemed bizarre and out-of-character.

First of all, Brennan’s very much on the side of constitutional rights. We’ve heard her soapbox about it in various ways throughout the seasons (cultural rights, personal freedoms, citizens’ rights like ‘right to bear arms,’ etc.), so this felt false to me. Her tone about it was rude.

As well, even though Brennan’s got issues with the subject of religion, she’s also got the experience to know about various cultures and their traditions, regardless of whether or not she agrees with them. Her issues with him taking time to pray throughout the day felt odd to me. If she wants his attention to be on the case, fine, but given that she hasn’t been in the lab very much all season, has been dropping the ball herself when it comes to uncovering important case details (her interns have been catching a lot of evidence bits), and hasn’t shown even a modicum of her former dedication to and excitement about bones and discoveries involving bone evidence, I’m not buying her sudden insistence that everyone work 24/7 to get her answers and I’m not buying that she is suddenly so irritated by another person’s beliefs. I don’t like it when the writers alter Brennan’s personality to suit the moment. Is she a brilliant, knowledgeable individual who has traveled extensively and is fascinated by many different cultures, or not?

To the intern’s credit, he smiled and ignored her antagonistic crack. As he also did when Cam impatiently commented, “How’s about you go back to prayer and give me a little breathing space?” At least Cam realized what she’d said in a moment of stress and followed it up with an apology.

Don’t get me wrong, Arastoo's final scene with Angela (when he gave her that mix CD of songs, to help her through her break-up) was very sweet and thus appreciated. But Angela, usually the sensitive one, actually snarked at him, “Oh, here we go. Are you going to quote the Qur’an?” I know she was upset about her recent break-up (no matter how much she tried to deny it), but that line seemed to come out of nowhere. Also, I’d think of all of them Angela would be the most interested in exploring or accepting a wide variety of beliefs, so for her to treat him so sarcastically did not feel in-character to me. The only thing that made that scene work for me was that she realized how wrong she’d been about him, loosened up visibly (nice job, Michaela), and gave him a hug of thanks. That was lovely.

A side point about Cam and stress: I giggled at Cam when she confessed (but not really) that she smokes… sometimes… very rarely… only occasionally, really… in times of great stress. That was funny. (Sad, too. Poor Cam. But still funny.)

Moving on to a great big part of the episode: Hodgins and Angela. :D

I saw that break-up between Angela and Roxy coming a mile away, the minute they were talking pets and Roxy seemed less than receptive. Poor Angela. And yet, why am I supposed to care about this break-up when the writers didn’t really spend any time on the development of the relationship itself first? We barely saw Roxy. We barely saw them together. We certainly haven’t seen Angela grow as a person since starting to date her again.

When they first got together, it felt like it was for shock value purposes only. Ooh, Angela’s kissing a girl, Angela’s a lesbian now… *gasp* :roll: If, after that initial episode, the writers had paid some attention to the actual relationship between them, showing Angela really trying this time (or in contrast, backtracking to former behaviors), then maybe it wouldn’t feel like such a waste of character development. That’s the problem for me, that they skipped over so much just to move on and get to the stuff they wanted (like this episode’s big moment between Hodgins and Angela).

Case in point: Roxy -- whom we haven’t seen in months, whose relationship with Angela we’ve barely even seen -- breaks up with Angela within the first ten minutes of the episode. For a really lame reason: Angela likes to live in the moment, while Roxy wants to think seriously about the future. Um, shouldn’t Roxy have realized this about Angela from the first time they dated years ago? Has she seen any indication that Angela has changed?

It all felt like such a big leap, not to mention a waste of character development potential. In doing it that way, am I supposed to care about the break-up? Because I really couldn’t muster up much sympathy at all. They didn’t show enough of the actual relationship for me to feel bad about it ending. Also, if Hodgins and Angela do get back together some day, how satisfying can it be when we haven’t seen Angela learn something from her relationship with Roxy?

Still, Michaela Conlin played it nicely. Shifting from a smiling expression of ‘isn’t this dog adorable, won’t it be a wonderful addition to our home when we move in together’ to the disappointed, downcast ‘oh, I just realized you’re breaking up with me’ expression was very well done.

I also loved the immediate shift in Hodgins, the look in his eyes when he realized something was wrong with Angela. It spoke to their former relationship, how well he knows her, and I really liked that. TJ was very expressive with the smallest look. And I liked how -- regardless of their painful history -- he immediately jumped to a help mode of “Angela’s in pain, she’s just broken up with her girlfriend, I understand what that feels like, I need to help her, I want to comfort her.” It’s such a lovely side to him, that giving nature.

I confess I really was expecting them to go somewhere for that cup of coffee and talk. I thought, cool, this could be an interesting conversation between them.

Imagine my open-mouthed shock when (after a Booth/Brennan on-the-case scene) they cut back to … Hodgins and Angela in bed together. :lol: I am so naïve. Silly, silly me. :mrgreen:

First of all, though I felt it happened too fast (again, skipping over Angela and Roxy’s relationship in order to get to scenes like this), it also seems to be pure Angela, to jump back into bed with Hodgins because she’s feeling upset and needy. And I admit it was nice to see them return to their old haunt in the Egyptian storage unit.

On a side note, I know it’s crude and superficial of me to say so, but: damn, TJ! I clearly need to be working out with you, because you know how to get results! :D You are looking mighty, mighty fine. Sheesh. W-O-W. I’m suddenly very distracted by your chest, shoulders, arms, and basically your entire torso. I’m sorry… where was I? Oh right, commentary. Moving on. ;)

Interesting body language between the two characters in this scene. When Hodgins and Angela were together as a couple, whenever they had a scene in bed together, they were linked, arms around each other, heads resting on shoulders or chests, plenty of contact. Yet, at the start of this scene, they’re both in bed side by side as individuals, no touching, no contact. I don’t know if it was planned that way, or if they did it instinctively as actors, but I like that; I felt it was a nice touch. It shows the distinct difference in their relationship now versus then.

And who breaches the divide first, touching and kissing the other person? Hodgins, of course. Oh, dear. He opens his heart so wide. It’s a vulnerable place to put oneself, especially when the other person in bed with him has already broken his heart before, repeatedly. Let us count the ways: when she first turned him down; when she turned him away even after their first date went so well; when she ‘forgot’ that she was already married and he went through months of private investigations and searching for the husband and enduring insults about how hot her former beau was (the implication that he was somehow lesser than in comparison), all of this so they could be together; and of course, their final break-up which was excruciating. And how does Angela see it? She didn’t need comforting, she insisted. (Um… I call bullshit on that, Angela.) Instead, she needed a good ‘tumble.’ Right.

It was interesting that she immediately told him (post-sex) that she was ‘fine’ about Roxy, that “people come and go in life.” Hmm. Methinks she doth protest too much? ;)

When Hodgins asked what Roxy had said (besides “So long”), Angela said: “Basically, she said she wants somebody who doesn’t just ‘live in the moment’ but who considers the future.” I confess I laughed at that moment because TJ’s facial expression in response was priceless. It was kind of like Hodgins was thinking to himself, “Welllllll… she’s not completely wrong about that, Angela, but for now I say absolutely nothing.” Heee. It was just such a great look. He paused, considered what she was saying, and then got this awesomely hilarious look on his face. And chose not to say a word in that moment, which was so funny to me. I loved that.

What I liked about this scene was that it forced Angela to think about stuff that she clearly does not want to think about. Yes, she was thinking about moving in with Roxy, and her wanting to get a dog was probably her way of showing that she was somehow in the relationship fully this time around. But I really do think that she hadn’t stopped to think about what she really wanted or needed, before she even starting seeing Roxy again. Until she comes to terms with whatever her commitment issues are, I really don’t think she’ll be able to be in a serious relationship with anybody. Which is why I hope we see more scenes like this, because conversations like this one with Hodgins challenging her to either face up to her stuff or do what she always does (run and hide, move on to the next relationship, all under the snappy guise of “Hey, I like to live in the moment, moments are fleeting, that’s all love is”) are important to the evolution of her character, and his.

Right now? She’s not ready. She asked Hodgins, “What’s wrong with the moment?” and he said simply, “Nothing.” He smiled kindly and gently (nice job, TJ), probably knowing she’s not ready to change yet. I think he sees it this time around. But what was lovely was that she nudged him, just a little bit, to be honest with her, when she followed his comment with “But…?” So he was honest with her: “But it’s… nice every once in a while to think about the future.” And that’s when she ran away again, not ready to think about it. Right after he says this to her, she turns away from him, starts to get up and get dressed. She’s so close to change, but not quite there yet.

Side note: I love the casual way TJ played it in that moment, as she’s getting dressed, like it was something the two characters had done a hundred times together, being intimate with each other and then getting up and getting dressed. He didn’t look upon her like a new lover, fascinated and curious; instead, it was comfortable and relaxed and sweet. I liked that approach a lot.

She’s trying, in little ways, with tentative questions, to figure things out. Which is why it was so sad and painful to watch her regress as she turned back to her charm, and her wide smile and casual flippant nature, as she turned to Hodgins and flirted, “So this… right now… this isn’t ‘together’?” And Hodgins’ heart-breaking shake of his head and honest reply was spot-on, just what he should have said, because he is different now, too: “It was a moment. A great moment, but like all great moments… it passed.” And she leaves the bed, leaves him, walks away, still not ready.

Personally, I think she knew the answer to that last question before she even asked, but she had to resort to her usual flirty behaviors to get through her sorrow about the Roxy break-up. She won’t admit it. Everything’s “fine.” But just seeing her revert to her former behaviors seems to indicate that she is very much not fine, and I want to see her move forward, bit by bit, and finally ‘get it.’ Whomever she’s with at that point will get an Angela who is finally able to give herself fully to the relationship in a way she’s never been able to before. I think it will be immeasurably cool when she gets there. I just hope the writers spend the time showing that evolution.

GREAT scene, beautifully played by both TJ and Michaela. And the look on his face as she leaves the bed and walks away is achingly sad because I think he knows that she’s not ready yet and he’s resigned to it. There’s nothing he can do. But I’m reminded of his speech in “The Girl With The Curl”: “What if it doesn’t end that way? What if it doesn’t go wrong?” Hodgins is such an interesting, contradictory character -- even though he’s suspicious and paranoid about some things, when it comes to what he loves (science and women), he’s such an optimist. He’s so full of hope. And we see a glimmer of that hope when (after she’s gone) he finds her earring on the bed. A talisman, perhaps, of hope; a promise of a better, richer, fuller relationship with her someday. And because he’s Hodgins, he holds on to that earring. He holds on to that hope. And that’s why I love his character. :romance-heartstiny:

I also loved seeing Brennan and Angela having a conversation, just the two of them. It feels like a long time since the writers have paid good attention to their friendship. It was nice to see them outside of the office, having a meal together, talking about personal stuff. I do think Angela is an idiot for sleeping with Hodgins anyway even though she confides in Brennan here that she knows Hodgins “can’t keep it casual.” He’s a fool to go there again right now when he knows she’s not ready, that’s his issue, but if Angela acknowledges full well that Hodgins can’t keep things casual, then why go there with him? Especially when she knows it could open a whole new mess of emotions that she won’t be able to handle or want him to have. She shouldn’t reopen that door if she knows he’s going to get hurt or want more from her than she’s willing to give. She doesn’t seem to be thinking about his feelings at all here, only what she needs or wants, and that bothers me because even though she’s a ‘free spirit’ kind of character, she’s also demonstrated extraordinary kindness and compassion (in cases where the rest of the team has been unable to), so I’m not sure why the writers are taking her to such callous behaviors lately. It troubles me.

I will say that I do like Brennan’s definition of love; that felt totally in character for her to say, and it amused me to see her so rational about it. (Even if I don’t happen to agree with her. LOL.) But I think Brennan is wrong in saying that Angela is in any way like her when it comes to picking people for sex. Angela does not use her brain; she does not plan these things rationally. She goes with the flow or ‘the moment,’ even if it’s to her own detriment.

At any rate, it was a nice, casual scene, well played by both Emily and Michaela. You can really get a sense that these two characters are good friends (even though they’re so different from each other). It’s fun to see the connection between them.

On to lab fun! I love when Hodgins gets all big word scientific. In those types of scenes, TJ plays Hodgins with a wonderful ‘zest for knowledge,’ love of science, and fun energy that makes me grin. We really get the sense that he (Hodgins) loves what he does and finds it fascinating to uncover fine details about the little pieces of evidence he examines. It’s quite cool, this facet of the character.

And a big Yay! for the intern coming up with that X-ray idea, in order to examine the bones even though the flesh was still intact. You know what they say, the simplest idea is usually the right one.

It was very nice to see Brennan back in the lab on a more regular basis. I think that’s an important trait to keep. And it was really cool to have the show go back to the start of season 2 with that ‘I claim one of my freebies’ comment from Brennan. That was very fun, especially the back and forth between Brennan and Cam in that moment over who would get to have the remains. I just wish they’d used the freebie bit at least once before this, because I almost forgot what the heck they were talking about.

I’ve got to say, though, I don’t understand the tightness and resentment Brennan exhibited towards Cam and the new intern this whole episode. She’s barely been in the lab much this season, she’s been much more relaxed about everything, even oddly so -- when would Brennan ever be calm when someone dared to compromise her remains, like Hodgins accidentally did when he turned a body into a hard shell in “Bones That Foam”? Now suddenly she’s all Alpha Female about her lab and her work again? I genuinely do not understand the back-and-forth with Brennan’s character. Why can’t she show consistent growth as a person? Why do they have her regressing and going out-of-character? It seems to be only for the convenience of a scene.

If she saw something of value in what Cam’s experiment proved, the Brennan I know and love would be impressed with that. She’s all about scientific journals and examining bones and discovering data in cool and unusual ways. (After all, who could ever forget the time she re-hydrated a victim’s hand, just so she could peel the skin off and put it on her own hand like a glove, in order to get the fingerprints? That was …well, it was disgusting, but it was also really fascinating.) I think it’s great to see someone (yay, Cam!) using science and doing something interesting on the show. The title of the program, Bones, may refer to Brennan, but it’s also a play on what she can do scientifically with bones, as a forensic anthropologist, so I think it’s important for the show to remember that science is a factor in this program. Maybe not the biggest focus, if they want to concentrate on character development more than cases, but it’s still a big part of who Brennan is. To ignore that is to ignore a large facet of her character. Then what is this show and who is she, really?

Small note: Brennan totally deserved that “Oh, by the way, you aren’t a real medical doctor either” comment from the chiropractor. Because she’s not, but her comment to him that he wasn’t one (but still surprisingly “helpful” to her) was pretty arrogant. Glad to see someone take her down a peg when it’s called for -- she’s a gifted anthropologist and a brilliant woman, but that doesn’t mean she’s infallible or untouchable.

Shifting gears here to Sweets. *ahem*

You all know I cannot stand it when Sweets interferes in Booth’s interrogations. I think it’s ridiculous that he needs to be there, feeding Booth ideas and questions, when Booth has been shown as more than capable of handling interrogations and sussing out when people are lying. He has great gut instincts, and I’ve always liked it when he would just smile at the suspect, like he’s figured them out, and then he asks them a great question to prove it. That said, this time around, I liked Sweets’ idea about the ‘pact’ and the $5000, and his interview with the ‘Alpha teenager’ of the volleyball team seemed to be putting his character to good use as a psychologist. About time! :D

And here’s a big shocker. I liked Sweets in that scene with Angela. :shock: I know, I know, I usually get worked up about the ways they use his character because I think it’s forced and he doesn’t have a purpose of his own, etc. But that scene was played really nicely between the two of them. Instead of it becoming a conversation between Angela and Mr. Psychologist Who Can Fix Everything, they talked like friends. It was very easy and casual and quiet and … just really nice. He didn’t push his ideas or agenda on her, until the moment leaned that way and it seemed appropriate to say something; until then, he simply listened. (Which seems to be more in line with how most psychologists behave, listening rather than telling the patient what they should be seeing about themselves or their issues. That’s the whole point of guiding a person to come to his or her own realizations, to make progress.) That was terrific. I liked this Sweets a lot. :clap:

And I laughed out loud at the knowing “Ohhh” he uttered when Angela said worriedly, “Brennan approves of the way I conduct my love life.” Heee. That was very funny and well-timed.

And it’s interesting that once again Angela is asking someone, “What’s wrong with living in the moment?” It’s almost like she’s looking for approval for that type of behavior, but the moment she gets it (like when Brennan agreed with her), she felt unsettled about it. That would indicate that she’s close to figuring things out, taking a step in a new direction. But here she is, asking Sweets the same question that she presented to Hodgins and Brennan. Interesting, very interesting. Again, I say, methinks the lady doth protest too much. No matter how many times Sweets said, “It’s fine so long as it’s working for you,” she kept insisting “It is, it’s working for me, no, really, definitely, it is.” Mm-hmm. :think: Time to examine things from another angle, Angela. Time to try something new, because obviously it’s not working for you. If it were, you and Roxy would still be together. Or, you and Hodgins. Or, you and Birem-what’s-his-name whom we don’t like because we like Hodgins (LOL). :mrgreen:

And really? I LOVED Sweets’ suggestion to Angela. To remove sex from the situation. I loved his hesitation in even suggesting it (because she’s not totally ready to listen in that regard), and I loved him finally saying it. I think that’s exactly what he should say to her. Frankly, it’s about time someone said it. “Forego sex in favor of other connections.” Brilliant. Whether or not she’s willing to follow through with that suggestion yet, the idea will be simmering in the back of her mind, and when she’s ready, maybe she will give it a try. Because until she tries to connect with someone on a level other than for sex, I don’t think she’s going to get different results than the failed relationships she keeps having. It’s partly why her relationship with Hodgins failed. He knocked himself out trying to understand her and give her what she needed, but she was too busy ‘living in the moment’ to really get to know him or appreciate him as a man and a person and a partner. She also seems to have no idea who she is or really wants to be. She went from “No, I can’t date you,” to “Okay, what the hell,” and then happily jumped into sex and moving in together and finally engagement, without ever really knowing who he was or (more importantly) who SHE was, with or without sex.

The look on her face when he even dared to suggest that she go without sex for a little while (okay, six months, which is probably an eternity for Angela) was hilarious and sad at the same time. Funny because hey, she’s the one who decided to take a leap and ask him what he thought, and sad because she immediately reverts back to being less than she can be, because she’s afraid to try something outside her usual behavioral routine. I think we can probably all relate to that, reverting back to old behaviors for some reason or another, at some point in our own lives.

I love her contradiction, though: even as she protested that she’s happy with her life the way it is, even though she said what Sweets had to say was “merely interesting” (heh), I do think she heard what he had to say. It seems to indicate that Angela is on the brink of moving forward and figuring things out, finally. She’s not quite there, but she’s close. And that could be really cool. :dance:

At any rate, it was a great scene between the two characters, and excellently played by John and Michaela. I enjoyed it a lot, and given how I usually feel about the way they over-utilize Sweets, that is really saying something.

I will also say that although I think Sweets is not qualified for undercover work, I did like the scene he and Angela had with the chiropractor. That was one case where I felt he might actually be able to pull off what they needed him to do. Beyond that, I do still think they give him too many jobs that used to be done by the other characters, perhaps just to give him something to do in an episode. I don’t think it’s necessary, and it bothers me, because even though it is only a television program and therefore fantastical, it is grounded in science and the realities that go with having an FBI agent as a lead character; therefore, to have him going outside of his job title, doing all these things he’s not qualified or trained for, that annoys the hell out of me. You don’t see Hodgins doing Brennan’s job, or Brennan doing Angela’s job. Just because some of these characters were geniuses or prodigies does not mean they can do anything in any scene. Why do they keep using Sweets for tasks that go way beyond what an FBI psychologist would probably do?

I liked the montage near the end. It felt like ‘old school’ Bones. It gave weight to the story and the characters, gave them each a moment: Booth with the confirmed killer; Cam covering up the victim’s body; Angela sorting through the memories of her failed relationships; Hodgins holding tight to that earring (and what an interesting, curious, thought-provoking expression on TJ’s face, in that moment -- great job, TJ); the intern praying, Brennan in the background, watching him… I really appreciated seeing all of that.

I loved the final scene between Booth and Clinton. First of all, Booth’s point to the kid that sex is never free and easy is a fascinating contrast from the question raised by Angela with her free-spirited notion of “What’s wrong with living in the moment?” And Booth impressing upon the kid the fact that those four children are his responsibility, whether the girls ask for his help or not … that was wonderful. It needed to be said. Clinton needed to hear that. And he won’t forget it, just as Angela probably won’t forget what Sweets said to her, either. It gave me chills when Booth got through to Clinton, especially by slowing ripping up the picture of Ashley, reminding him that she had been carrying his child and now she and the baby were both dead. The inexplicable clown that Booth’s been all season? Whatever. He doesn’t interest me. This guy, in this scene, this is the Booth that I love. The one who is honorable and smart and knows just what to say to someone when they need to hear it. (Like after Brennan shot Epps in “Blonde in the Game” and she was upset and needed comfort; or to Cam in her first episode when she was having trouble connecting with the team and getting them to listen to her.) It was a great scene, the actor who played Clinton did a super job, and David played his part with the gravity and maturity it needed. He held my attention, and it was terrific.

While the case itself was a bit unbelievable and started out presented in a flippant manner, overall it was a decent episode that finished strong, most especially due to everyone’s finely tuned performances.
word count: 7222

User avatar
skftex
TJ Team Validator
Posts: 2304
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 9:16 pm
Location: Texas
Contact:

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by skftex »

Sherry I read it all! Interesting. I have some things I'd like to say but don't want to stay up all night typing and I will comment more later but wanted to say..the chiropractor (The WEST WING! :mrgreen: )
word count: 40
Blessed are they who see beautiful things in humble places where other people see nothing.-Camille Pissarro

User avatar
ThyneAlone
TJ Team Validator
Posts: 2699
Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 2:30 am
Location: Northwest UK, near Liverpool

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by ThyneAlone »

She's awesome, isn't she?
word count: 6
"We make our lives out of chaos and hope. And love." - Angela Montenegro

User avatar
Lonia
Super Fan
Posts: 113
Joined: Sat Mar 07, 2009 4:00 am

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by Lonia »

ThyneAlone wrote:She's awesome, isn't she?
Yes, she is.

Wow, Sherry - that was a comment about the episode. I LOVED to read it. You really put some thoughts into what happened in this episode.
word count: 36

Sinkwriter72
King of the Lab
Posts: 1856
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2007 3:21 pm
Location: Illinois, USA

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by Sinkwriter72 »

Actually, you guys are the awesome ones for making it through that incredibly long commentary! :D *hugs all three of you* Thanks for that. And I'm very glad you enjoyed it.

Sharon, I'd love to hear your thoughts. I'm glad you didn't stay up all night typing! Heee. That would be exhausting! As it was, writing my commentary took a few days, here and there. Not to mention almost a week's worth of letting the episode simmer in my brain before I knew how I felt about it in entirety. Still, it's fun for me to think about such things and analyze and discuss, so I hope anyone who has opinions and wants to have a conversation about it will feel free to post away! :mrgreen:

P.S. to Sharon again. I knew that guy looked familiar but I couldn't remember why! (It's been so long since I've watched the final seasons of West Wing.) He worked for Santos, didn't he? Good man.
word count: 171

User avatar
ThyneAlone
TJ Team Validator
Posts: 2699
Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 2:30 am
Location: Northwest UK, near Liverpool

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by ThyneAlone »

Well, this is very Lot's wife, isn't it? The Biblical wife who did what she had been told not to do and was turned into a pillar of salt as a result? Or maybe that folk tale of 'why the sea is salt', where someone who doesn't know what he is getting into handles a magical salt grinder, which ends up in the ocean because he can't stop it once he's started it?

Former pals of mine on tv.com/bones will know that I like to look for themes in 'Bones' eps. To some extent I have been unable to do this for a while because of their 'bittiness' and lack of character continuity. In this one, however, I can spot a fairly lucid look at 'consequences', so I'll have a look at the overview; Sherry's done her usual magnificent job on the minutiae of character and relationships!

It is not just adolescents, obviously, who can't see, and therefore trivialise, the results of their actions. Angela is shown, more than at any other time, leaving a trail of emotional destruction behind her and trying to cling to her selfish tenets even as she begins to realise they don't work. And in the same way as the X-rays expose what happened to Ashley, Sweets and the others are beginning to reveal to Angela the underlying consequences, for both her and her lovers, of her protective skin of proclaimed attitudes. She is, of course, still running away from them. But I first loved Angela for her sensitivity to others, and it is no longer showing. To be frank, it hasn't really shown since the abortive wedding plan, so maybe the shallowness is a reaction to that. What's happened to the girl who beat herself up for her treatment of Kirk, calmed Hodgins when he was panicking about getting Booth to that crime scene while the girl was still alive and helped him through both his experiences in 'Aliens' and his grief for his murdered friend?

Because we don't see anything of the Roxy relationship, we feel nothing for it (a bit like Kennedy and Willow in Buffy, for those who remember it) and don't really understand it. So, despite Roxy's tears, the consequences of Angela's 'in the moment' creed are not fully realised until we see her in bed with Hodgins in such a different guise from previously; defensive, flip, unable to open up to him and indeed hurtful in her suggestion that she feels no emotional connection between them at all, that she was just using him as an outlet. Sex is only a very temporary solution to Angela's problems. But the results for Jack of her continued mixed messages to him are plain to see, thanks to TJ's awesome and subtle catalogue of expressions.

So how does she compare to the boy Clinton (interesting name btw), who also has no clue of the massive ripple effect his actions are about to generate? They come quite close in spite of the age difference. He keeps telling himself what a man of the world this makes him, how he has helped people in their development and life plans, proved himself sexually; blind to the havoc he is wreaking. And she does exactly the same!

Like Sherry, I'm not at all happy with the teen pregnancy pact. I don't like the way it is left open, with these little girls seemingly still completely unaware of what this will do to their lives. I want closure for them as for Clinton. I don't want them to keep thinking of their real, live, human children as dolls to dress up or pawns in a rebellion against parental pressure. What sort of image of young women is being projected here? They too need to see the consequences, which could be far worse than them than for the father. Poverty, misery, rebuffal by their families, internal divisions and jealousy in their commune, partners who don't want another man's child. Whether they are going to pay attention, like Clinton, or apparently reject it, like Angela (though I think the celibacy thing is going to brew in her mind until she decides to adopt it), they need advice about their bizarre and dangerous decision.

On a separate issue, my other half and I had mixed feelings about the lovely Muslim intern. I have never understood Brennan's rude and vocal condemnations of other people's beliefs. All logic states that she should indicate that she doesn't share them but without rancour, accepting that other people have different life paths. She was really unpleasant to this guy (mind you, she has a tendency not to consider the consequences of her behaviour either, which is why Angela was alarmed at her claiming sisterhood with her!). But in the times we are living through, a Muslim who peacefully acknowledged her views, remained positive and got on with doing an excellent job - never mind extending compassion and understanding to his female colleagues - was a great image to project.

I have a lingering unease that Ashley's horrid death and 'mummification' -yes, becoming a Mummy in the only way yet remaining to her (I do realise that this is a pun chiefly for British viewers!) - seemed somehow to come across as a punishment for her thoughtless behaviour, and Clinton's. I didn't like that. But, overall, there were some coherent ideas here - the harking back to previous seasons, the use of Sweets, Hodgins' behaviour - which hint at development in spite of a few OOC bum notes. So this ep was not purely part of the ground preparation for the BB arc to come.
word count: 965
"We make our lives out of chaos and hope. And love." - Angela Montenegro

Sinkwriter72
King of the Lab
Posts: 1856
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2007 3:21 pm
Location: Illinois, USA

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by Sinkwriter72 »

Excellent commentary, Steph! :clap:

A few thoughts regarding your thoughts. Heh. ;)

ThyneAlone wrote:
Angela is shown, more than at any other time, leaving a trail of emotional destruction behind her and trying to cling to her selfish tenets even as she begins to realise they don't work.


Nicely put, Steph!

And I like your comparison between the X-rays (that showed what was going on underneath the flesh) and the way Angela was being exposed to her troubling behaviors throughout the episode. Like the victim whose flesh covered up the secrets of what she went through, Angela really does have that protective layer of (metaphorical) skin covering up her own feelings, doesn't she? Anyway, very poetic, that symbolic observation, Steph. I love it.

ThyneAlone wrote:
What's happened to the girl who beat herself up for her treatment of Kirk, calmed Hodgins when he was panicking about getting Booth to that crime scene while the girl was still alive and helped him through both his experiences in 'Aliens' and his grief for his murdered friend?


Those are some excellent questions.

Also, great comparison of the Angela/Roxy relationship with Willow/Kennedy's. With Willow and Kennedy, I just felt like the whole thing was unnecessarily forced upon the audience. Willow didn't need to jump into another relationship, and I really didn't think she should (or would want to), considering the love of her life recently had been murdered. Why would she feel the need to seek out another relationship? It never really felt right to me. And they didn't delve into it the way they did when Willow was with Tara or with Oz, so I never saw enough of it to genuinely care all that much. It just felt pointless. Just like here with the Angela/Roxy relationship. I want to feel bad that they broke up, but how can I when we never saw them flourish as a couple first?

ThyneAlone wrote:
Sex is only a very temporary solution to Angela's problems. But the results for Jack of her continued mixed messages to him are plain to see, thanks to TJ's awesome and subtle catalogue of expressions.


Absolutely! Great job, TJ. Seriously. You did some really nice work in this episode, most especially in that bedroom scene with Angela.
ThyneAlone wrote:
I don't want them to keep thinking of their real, live, human children as dolls to dress up or pawns in a rebellion against parental pressure. What sort of image of young women is being projected here?


I posted this commentary to my LJ yesterday, and a friend replied that she thought they hadn't bothered to reprimand the girls because it was pretty much too little, too late, since they were all already pregnant or parents at that point. However, like you point out, just as Clinton needed to understand the full impact of what he'd done and what it means, I think these girls still need to grow up and realize the impact of their actions, especially because they are parents now and will need to see that there are (or were) other ways of handling their issues. They'll need to understand that in order to teach their own children someday. Just because they're suddenly parents doesn't make them fully developed adults. They still have things to learn. (Hell, even adults have plenty to learn! *GRIN*)
ThyneAlone wrote:
I have a lingering unease that Ashley's horrid death and 'mummification' -yes, becoming a Mummy in the only way yet remaining to her


*GROAN* Becoming a mummy. Oh, Steph. Heee. :mrgreen:

(And you know what my first thought was, when reading that sentence? The Doctor Who episode where the kid with the gas mask keeps saying, very creepily, "Are you my mummy?" *shudder*)

Nevertheless, it's an interesting comment, that it seemed to be presented almost like a punishment for their actions, which is troubling. :think: Hmm.
word count: 660

User avatar
ThyneAlone
TJ Team Validator
Posts: 2699
Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 2:30 am
Location: Northwest UK, near Liverpool

Re: Bones 4.17 The Salt in the Wounds

Post by ThyneAlone »

Yes, that Steven Moffat 2-parter 'The Empty Child' and 'The Doctor Dances' - classic S1 NuWho. It did make the very word 'mummy' scary. Actually I think that is the sign of good classic horror. Taking a security blanket and poisoning it. Another one of those episodes where I cry at the end because of the parent/child references - I do that in Bones episodes where a child is involved, but only where it seems realistic. The kids in the boarding school who murdered their schoolmate and the creepy little girl who killed her 'manny' didn't move me, they were so cold.

I want to thank you for reading and commenting so thoroughly. And I love that you understand all my random references, from the Bible to BtVS and beyond. If you hadn't noticed, :roll: lol, I do tend to relate my reviews to my other literary and artistic experiences. I can't help it, honestly; it's not me being pretentious! I find commenting in a vacuum quite hard!

I do worry when a murder victiim has done something wrong (particularly something in the complex and confused area of sexuality) and simplistic presentation prompts the response 'serves him/her right'. This happens in other procedurals too and indeed in the media. It's a wrong message. Like there are still people around who really think that the Jack The Ripper murders were slightly more comprehensible because of the victims being prostitutes? :(

Anyway. That was slightly offtopic! I'll be interested to see what direction this episode points Jack and Angela. It could go either way at the moment. Is that earring Jack's hope or his memento?
word count: 279
"We make our lives out of chaos and hope. And love." - Angela Montenegro